Rootless and extravagant dreamers, opinionated and unprejudiced, sharply-witted, independent and faintly narcissistic. These are the Berlin kids in all their beautiful contradictions.

#meettheberlinkids

Chapter 6:

CHRISTOPH

Some friendships just blossom when you least expect it.

For sure, on the evening I first met him, when I passed my ice cold beer over to Christoph in a Finnish sauna and convinced him to show his bum to a bunch of horny gospel girls on a rehearsal break, I had no idea he was to become one of my closest friends.

I immediately felt very fascinated by the passion this guy had for this city and his eagerness to get to know even more of it. Before I had the time to realise it, we were trying out a bunch of other “secret” saunas and ticked several sports and activities off our bucket list. We exposed ourselves to each other fully, disclosed secrets, talked about hopes and fears and collected quite a few incredible memories. Christoph saw me at my lowest ebb and was there when I needed a friend the most. Something I will never forget.

CHRISTOPH BY CHRISTOPH

Name: Christoph Sonntag
In Berlin since: Born and raised here
Where did you live before moving to Berlin: I did
my bachelor in Bremen and Paris.
Profession: In the process of becoming a
psychotherapist.
Dream profession: art historian, psychotherapist.
Biggest inspirations: I find inspiration in many
people that are mindful, good hearted and
passionate; apart from that in music and arts.
Favourite activities in Berlin: singing in a choir,
going to exhibitions, exploring new places.
The place to be in Berlin: Tempelhofer Feld – a good
place to clear up your mind, go running or meet
friends.
Your best Berlin story: Berlin is like one of those
glitter snow globes. Open your eyes and see
colourful particles passing by. No need to tell old
stories. There are so many new ones happening
right now.
Picture yourself in 10 years: working part time as a
psychotherapist and having enough time for friends,
family life and hobbies.

“In 1990, on the occasion of the German reunification, a Japanese TV station launched a fundraising campaign which managed to collect about 1 million euros.
With that money, more than ten thousands trees of the Japanese cherry blossom variety, were planted by 2010 in Berlin and Brandenburg. They are meant to bring “peace and tranquility to the hearts of the people”.
Andrea took these shots of me on the longest cherry tree alley of Berlin, right where the Berlin wall once devided the city. I was happy to show him the spot on a sunny day in April. We met in a Finnish sauna a few moths ago where we had a beer and a good chat – just like Finns do. We became friends and continued to go to saunas together. This is how we made it through harsh and dark Berlin winter. And here we are surrounded by flowers in spring.”

“I’m becoming a psychotherapist. To raise hope for better days to come – even in the darkness of a deep depression – is central for a successful therapy. I don’t only want to achieve a reduction of the symptoms, but I aim at improving the wellbeing of my patients to eventually see them flourish.”

“Oh wow, you are a real Berliner?!“ That’s often the first reaction I get from people when I introduce myself, as if
growing up here was an accomplishment. I guess what’s behind this reaction is the fact that people find it interesting to
hear how Berlin was before the hype started somewhere at the beginning of the nineties. Then I’m quick to answer that
my childhood memories are mostly located in three areas of this city: Hansaviertel near Tiergarten, where my family
lived till I was 10, the green southwest of Berlin, where we moved when I got to secondary school, and Wannsee where
I spent most of my free time sailing. I’m sorry – no stories of Berlin’s typical roughness or freedom of undefined spaces.

However, it depicts something very typical for Berlin: much of a Berliner’s daily life takes place only in a few quarters.
People identify much with their “Kiez“, the neighbourhood they live in.. As a child and young teenager I had no idea of
how big Berlin was. Later on, at the age of 18, I started to explore the city and fill the streets on the map with
memories. And that has been a hobby ever since. Because the cliché of the ever changing city is true.”

Miranda Sensomat RE, Fujicolor 200 / Lomo CN 100 (35)

Nikon N55, Petzval 58 Bokeh Control, Fuji Superia 200 (35)

04-09/2018, Berlin und Sächsische Schweiz (Germany)

 

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February 11, 2019

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